The Difference Between an EBR and a QBR

Oni McNeil
  -  
July 3, 2024
  -  
5 min

When managing a customer, business reviews are essential to ensure that goals are being met and to adjust strategies as needed. Two types of reviews that companies often offer their customers are an Executive Business Review (EBR) and a Quarterly Business Review (QBR). Although both of these reviews aim to showcase what the customer has achieved with their product, they are different in their focus, the audience, and even in their objectives.

Executive Business Review (EBR)

An Executive Business Review is a strategic meeting that is held annually or semi-annually. The aim is to evaluate the performance of the service or product, discuss its impact on the business, and ensure it aligns with the organization's strategic goals. This review involves the senior leadership team of the customer’s company. 

During an EBR, discussions focus on key topics using metrics and KPIs, an analysis of the return on investment, and ultimately making it clear that the product is providing significant value (helping make a future renewal conversation easier)..

Quarterly Business Review (QBR)

On the other hand, a Quarterly Business Review is a meeting held every three months. The primary participants are usually middle management and company stakeholders. The main goal of a QBR is to showcase the value of your product or service at scale, highlight successes, and offer actionable recommendations for getting more value.

QBRs tend to focus on performance metrics, such as how things are going with user adoption, feature usage, and even how they are doing compared to other similar companies.. These reviews are more detailed, providing a granular look at how your product or services are performing in achieving customer goals and focused on helping guide the customer to getting more out of it. 

Key Differences

Focus and Attendees

The most significant difference between an EBR and a QBR is their focus and attendees. 

An EBR is a broad and high-level meeting held with executives to help them understand the ROI of your product. 

In contrast, a QBR is a narrow and intentional meeting held with key stakeholders and concentrated on tactical aspects around the adoption and usage of your product or service. 

What Data is Being Used

 EBR

  • Account Information
  • ROI
  • Benchmarking data
  • Strategic recommendations

QBR Data

Account Information

User Adoption

Product Usage

ROI

Benchmarking data

Tactical recommendations

Agenda Examples

EBR Agenda

Introduction

Executive Summary

Strategic Initiatives and Advancements

ROI Key Takeaways

Customer Feedback and Expectations

Actionable Recommendations

QBR Agenda

Introductions 

Executive Summary 

Account Overview 

Usage Overview

ROI Key Takeaways 

Industry Comparisons

Recommendations

Conclusion

Both EBRs and QBRs are essential tools for helping customers realize ROI and showcasing product value, but they serve different purposes. EBRs provide the strategic oversight needed to guide the customer toward renewal, while QBRs ensure that the customer remains on track to realizing ROI. By understanding and leveraging the distinct advantages of each, companies can ensure that customers find value in their product and that come renewal time, it’s an easy yes for customers.

When managing a customer, business reviews are essential to ensure that goals are being met and to adjust strategies as needed. Two types of reviews that companies often offer their customers are an Executive Business Review (EBR) and a Quarterly Business Review (QBR). Although both of these reviews aim to showcase what the customer has achieved with their product, they are different in their focus, the audience, and even in their objectives.

Executive Business Review (EBR)

An Executive Business Review is a strategic meeting that is held annually or semi-annually. The aim is to evaluate the performance of the service or product, discuss its impact on the business, and ensure it aligns with the organization's strategic goals. This review involves the senior leadership team of the customer’s company. 

During an EBR, discussions focus on key topics using metrics and KPIs, an analysis of the return on investment, and ultimately making it clear that the product is providing significant value (helping make a future renewal conversation easier)..

Quarterly Business Review (QBR)

On the other hand, a Quarterly Business Review is a meeting held every three months. The primary participants are usually middle management and company stakeholders. The main goal of a QBR is to showcase the value of your product or service at scale, highlight successes, and offer actionable recommendations for getting more value.

QBRs tend to focus on performance metrics, such as how things are going with user adoption, feature usage, and even how they are doing compared to other similar companies.. These reviews are more detailed, providing a granular look at how your product or services are performing in achieving customer goals and focused on helping guide the customer to getting more out of it. 

Key Differences

Focus and Attendees

The most significant difference between an EBR and a QBR is their focus and attendees. 

An EBR is a broad and high-level meeting held with executives to help them understand the ROI of your product. 

In contrast, a QBR is a narrow and intentional meeting held with key stakeholders and concentrated on tactical aspects around the adoption and usage of your product or service. 

What Data is Being Used

 EBR

  • Account Information
  • ROI
  • Benchmarking data
  • Strategic recommendations

QBR Data

Account Information

User Adoption

Product Usage

ROI

Benchmarking data

Tactical recommendations

Agenda Examples

EBR Agenda

Introduction

Executive Summary

Strategic Initiatives and Advancements

ROI Key Takeaways

Customer Feedback and Expectations

Actionable Recommendations

QBR Agenda

Introductions 

Executive Summary 

Account Overview 

Usage Overview

ROI Key Takeaways 

Industry Comparisons

Recommendations

Conclusion

Both EBRs and QBRs are essential tools for helping customers realize ROI and showcasing product value, but they serve different purposes. EBRs provide the strategic oversight needed to guide the customer toward renewal, while QBRs ensure that the customer remains on track to realizing ROI. By understanding and leveraging the distinct advantages of each, companies can ensure that customers find value in their product and that come renewal time, it’s an easy yes for customers.

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